The Regina Collection

Named as a tribute to Saskatchewan’s capital city and its rich history of boundary-defying innovation, The Regina Collection builds upon our motto of “a voice for many peoples.” These beautifully packaged books are written by authors who have been caught in social and political circumstances beyond their control.

The Regina Collection is published by University of Regina Press.

Out of My Mind

A Psychologist’s Descent into Madness and Back

$19.95

9780889776890

University of Regina Press

On paper, psychologist Dr. Shalom Camenietzski seemed to have it all—a beautiful family, a thriving practice, and supportive friends and colleagues. But in reality, he lived a life of turmoil—obsessive daydreams of taking his life, flamboyant periods of mania, disturbing acts of violence against his wife and son, and various episodes of psychosis, one of which would see him speeding his car the wrong way up Toronto’s Gardiner Expressway. Able to understand the clinical profile of his bipolar disorder, he was nonetheless powerless to stop it.
 
A fascinating account of a “mentally disordered healer,” Out of My Mind reveals the strengths and fallibilities of traditional psychotherapies and shows how Dr. Camenietzki finally obtained a symptom-free life.
 

Angry Queer Somali Boy

A Complicated Memoir

Mohamed Abdulkarim Ali

$19.95

9780889776593

University of Regina Press

A story of a young man's queer coming of age amidst displacement, violence, and alienation

Kidnapped by his father on the eve of Somalia’s societal implosion, Mohamed Ali was taken first to the Netherlands by his stepmother, and then later on to Canada. Unmoored from his birth family and caught between twin alienating forces of Somali tradition and Western culture, Mohamed must forge his own queer coming of age.

What follows in this fierce and unrelenting account is a story of one young man’s nascent sexuality fused with the violence wrought by displacement.

The Listener

In the Shadow of the Holocaust

Irene Oore

$19.95

9780889776531

University of Regina Press

A reflection on how trauma is passed from generation to generation

In The Listener, a daughter receives a troubling gift: her mother’s stories of surviving World War II in Poland. During the Holocaust, Irene Oore’s mother escaped the death camps by concealing her Jewish identity. Those years found her constantly on the run and on the verge of starvation, living a harrowing and peripatetic existence as she struggled to keep herself and her family alive.

Throughout the memoir, Oore reveals a certain ambivalence towards the gift bestowed upon her. The stories of fear, love, and constant hunger traumatised her as a child. Now, she shares these same stories with her own children, to keep the history alive.

Florence of America

A Feminist in the Age of McCarthyism

Florence Bean James, Jean Freeman

$19.95

9780889776470

University of Regina Press

The life of the woman who brought professional theatre to Canada

Born on the Idaho frontier, Florence James was a New York City suffragette. The first to put Jimmy Cagney on stage, she founded both the Negro Repertory Theatre and the Seattle Repertory Playhouse. She worked with Francis Farmer, Paul Robson, and Helen Hayes, but her views on art and politics and her choice of plays led to a clash with the Un-American Activities Committee. In the wake of two Kafkaesque trials, where she condemned her persecutors as liars, she fled to Canada and kick-started professional theatre in Saskatchewan, the home to North America’s first socialist government.

This new edition of Fists Upon a Star (called “sensational” by Jimmy Cagney) tells an inspiring story of one woman speaking truth to power.

In My Own Moccasins

A Memoir of Resilience

Helen Knott

$19.95

9780889776449

University of Regina Press

A reflection on what can be said about addiction, trauma, and the pains of sexual violence

Helen Knott, a highly accomplished Indigenous woman, seems to have it all. But in her memoir, she offers a different perspective. In My Own Moccasins is an unflinching account of addiction, intergenerational trauma, and the wounds brought on by sexual violence. It is also the story of sisterhood, the power of ceremony, the love of family, and the possibility of redemption.

With gripping moments of withdrawal, times of spiritual awareness, and historical insights going back to the signing of Treaty 8 by her great-great grandfather, Chief Bigfoot, her journey exposes the legacy of colonialism, while reclaiming her spirit.

American Refugees

Turning to Canada for Freedom

Rita Shelton Deverell

$17.95

9780889776258

University of Regina Press

The hopeful promise of a life in Canada and why Americans feel the urge to escape there

When it became clear that Donald Trump would become the new US president on election night in 2016, the website for Citizenship and Immigration Canada crashed. It was overwhelmed by Americans afraid that the United States would once again enter a period of intolerance and military aggression. In American Refugees, Rita Deverell shows that from the Revolutionary War to the Underground Railroad through to McCarthyism and Vietnam, Americans have fled to Canada in times of crisis. Many still flee. All have sought better lives, while helping to shape Canada into the country it is today.

The Organist

Fugues, Fatherhood, and a Fragile Mind

Mark Abley

$19.95

9780889775817

University of Regina Press

A son's story of living in his father's shadow of genius tainted by depression

Harry Abley was a nightmare of a father: depressive, self-absorbed, unpredictable, emotionally unstable. He was also a dream of a father: gentle, courageous, artistically gifted. Mark Abley, his only child, grew up in the shadow of music and mental illness. How he came to terms with this divided legacy, and how he learned to be a man in the absence of a traditional masculine role model, are central to this beautifully written memoir. This extraordinary story will speak to all those who love music, who struggle with depression, or who wrestle with the difficult bonds of love between a parent and a child.

Antigone Undone

Juliette Binoche, Anne Carson, Ivo van Hove, and the Art of Resistance

Will Aitken

$19.95

9780889775213

University of Regina Press

What can be learned from tragedy and the art of theater

In 2015 Will Aitken journeyed to Luxembourg for the rehearsals and premiere of Anne Carson’s translation of Sophokles’ 5th-century BCE tragedy Antigone, starring Juliette Binoche and directed by theatrical sensation Ivo van Hove.

In watching the play, he became awestruck with the plight of the young woman at the centre of the action. “Look at what these men are doing to me,” An­tigone cries, expressing the predicament of the dispossessed throughout time. Transfixed by the strange and uncanny power of the play, he finds himself haunted by its protagonist, finally resulting in a suicidal breakdown.

With a backstage view of the action, Aitken illuminates the creative process of Carson, Binoche, and Van Hove and offers a rare glimpse into collaborative genius in action. He also investi­gates the response to the play by Hegel, Virginia Woolf, Judith Butler, and others, who too, were moved by its timeless protest against injustice.

On Forgiveness and Revenge

Lessons from an Iranian Prison

Ramin Jahanbegloo

$19.95

9780889775008

University of Regina Press

Insightful reflection on what can be understood of feelings such as bitterness and revenge

"As I walked out the door toward the gate that would lead to my freedom, I knew if I didn't leave my bitterness and hatred behind, I'd still be in prison." - Nelson Mandela

Upon his release from Iran's notorious Evin Prison, philosopher Ramin Jahanbegloo contemplated the words of Mandela as he grappled with demons arising from being unjustly imprisoned.

He then began to wrestle with ideas of forgiveness versus revenge, and wondered if the politics of forgiveness could offer salvation in a world where revenge endangers the social and political fabric of our lives.

"What is forgiveness, and how do we get there?" Jahanbegloo asks, in this follow-up to his internationally celebrated book Time Will Say Nothing: A Philosopher Survives an Iranian Prison.

Prevailing upon the wisdom of the Ancients, the Dalai Lama, and other great thinkers, this meditation on forgiveness and revenge offers insights into building a more peaceful world during this time of nationalism and exclusion.

Memoirs of a Muhindi

Fleeing East Africa for the West

Mansoor Ladha

$21.95

9780889774742

University of Regina Press

In Memoirs of a Muhindi, Mansoor Ladha bears witness to what happens when nations turn against entire religious and ethnic groups.

When, in 1972, Ugandan president Idi Amin expelled Africans of Indian descent from the country, he unleashed an intolerance that set off an exodus from the entire region. In Tanzania and Kenya, businesses were nationalized, properties taken, people harassed, and livelihoods upended.

Mansoor Ladha, who was living in Nairobi at the time, had to decide whether to stay or leave. Canada became his new home—where he found considerable success, as did the rest of the Ismaili community—while East Africa never recovered from its fit of bigotry.

The Education of Augie Merasty

A Residential School Memoir - New Edition

David Carpenter

$19.95

9780889774575

University of Regina Press

The harsh truth of racist politics in Canada's schools as seen through the eyes of a child

Named the fourth most important “Book of the Year” by the National Post and voted “One Book/One Province” in Saskatchewan, The Education of Augie Merasty launched on the front page of The Globe and Mail to become a national bestseller.

Publishers Weekly called the book “historically significant,” and The Toronto Star recommended it as a must read for “any Canadian interested in truth and reconciliation.” Writing in The Globe and Mail, educator J.D.M. Stewart noted that it “is well suited to a teenage audience because of its brevity and frankness.”

This new edition includes a Learning Guide that deepens our understanding of the residential school experience, making it ideal for classroom and book club use. It also features a new postscript by David Carpenter, describing how the publication of his memoir changed Augie Merasty’s life.

Towards a Prairie Atonement

Trevor Herriot

$17.95

9780889774544

University of Regina Press

Towards a Prairie Atonement addresses the question of our relationship with the land by enlisting the help of a Metis Elder and revisiting the history of one corner of the Great Plains.

This book's lyrical blend of personal narrative, prairie history, imagery, and argument begins with the cause of protecting native grasslands on community pastures. As the narrative unfolds, however, Trevor Herriot, the award-winning author of Grass, Sky, Song and River in a Dry Land, finds himself recruited into the work of reconciliation.

Facing his own responsibility as a descendent of settlers, he connects today's ecological disarray to the legacy of Metis dispossession and the loss of their community lands. With Indigenous and settler people alienated from one another and from the grassland itself, hope and courage are in short supply. This book offers both by proposing an atonement that could again bring people and prairie together.

Otto & Daria

A Wartime Journey Through No Man's Land

Eric Koch

$21.95

9780889774438

University of Regina Press

A poignant memoir of lives cleaved by war, Otto and Daria is the first-hand account of Eric (or Otto) Koch. As a Jewish refugee from WWII Germany, Otto first left his country for England, and later arrived in Canada, where he was for a time imprisoned in a camp. The counterpoint to Otto's recollections are the letters from his long-distance love interest, Daria Hambourg, a London girl of bohemian temperament, unusual literary talents and a distinguished, but restrictive, family background. These parallel writings tell the story of two young people caught in the grip of history, and together show what you have to give up in order to move forward.

Inside The Mental

Silence, Stigma, Psychiatry, and LSD

Kay Parley

$19.95

9780889774117

University of Regina Press

Before she became a psychiatric nurse at "The Mental" in the 1950s, Kay Parley was a patient there, as were the father she barely remembered and the grandfather she'd never met. Part memoir, part history, and beautifully written, Inside The Mental offers an episodic journey into the stigma, horror, and redemption that she found within the institution's walls.

Now in her nineties, Parley looks back at the emerging use of group therapy, the advent of patients' rights, evolving ethics in psychiatry, and the amazing cast of characters she met there.

She also reveals her role in groundbreaking experiments with LSD, pioneered by the world's leading researchers at "The Mental" to treat addiction and mental illness.

Time Will Say Nothing

A Philosopher Survives an Iranian Prison

Ramin Jahanbegloo

$24.95

9780889773028

University of Regina Press

The powers of wisdom for a philospher contained by the walls of a prison

Sorbonne-educated and the author of almost 30 books, Ramin Jahanbegloo, a philosopher of non-violence in the tradition of Tolstoy and Gandhi, was arrested and detained in Iran’s notorious Evin prison in 2006.

A petition against his imprisonment was initiated, with Umberto Eco, Jurgen Habermas, and Noam Chomsky among the signatories. International organizations joined in, and media around the world reported his case extensively. Finally, after four months, he was released.

In this memoir Jahanbegloo recounts his confinement, his fear for his life, and his concern for the well-being of his family. With cockroaches his only companions, he is sustained by the wisdom of the great philosophers and by his memories of childhood in Tehran and coming-of-age in Paris.

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