Preserving Ethnicity through Religion in America

Preserving Ethnicity through Religion in America

Korean Protestants and Indian Hindus across Generations

by Pyong Gap Min

Published by: NYU Press

280 pages, 6.00 x 9.00 in

  • Paperback
  • ISBN: 9780814795866
  • Published: April 2010

$28.00

BUY
  • Hardcover
  • ISBN: 9780814795859
  • Published: April 2010

$89.00

BUY

2012 Honorable Mention Award, Sociology of Religion Section, presented by the American Sociological Association

2011 Honorable Mention for the American Sociological Association International Migration Section's Thomas and Znaniecki Best Book



Preserving Ethnicity through Religion in America explores the factors that may lead to greater success in ethnic preservation. Pyong Gap Min compares Indian Americans and Korean Americans, two of the most significant ethnic groups in New York, and examines the different ways in which they preserve their ethnicity through their faith. Does someone feel more “Indian” because they practice Hinduism? Does membership in a Korean Protestant church aid in maintaining ties to Korean culture?

Pushing beyond sociological research on religion and ethnicity which has tended to focus on whites or on a single immigrant group or on a single generation, Min also takes actual religious practice and theology seriously, rather than gauging religiosity based primarily on belonging to a congregation. Fascinating and provocative voices of informants from two generations combine with telephone survey data to help readers understand overall patterns of religious practices for each group under consideration. Preserving Ethnicity through Religion in America is remarkable in its scope, its theoretical significance, and its methodological sophistication.

X