About NYU Press Our Affiliates Jobs Sitemap
 
Children and Youth in a New Nation
Edited By James Marten
 
320 pages
10 illustrations
January, 2009
ISBN: 9780814757499
 
Introduction
Table of Contents
 
$25.00 Paper
also available in Cloth, eBook
click here for exam copies
 
Bookmark and Share
 
Subjects: History
Part of the  Children and Youth in America Series
 

In the early years of the Republic, as Americans tried to determine what it meant to be an American, they also wondered what it meant to be an American child. A defensive, even fearful, approach to childhood gave way to a more optimistic campaign to integrate young Americans into the Republican experiment.

In Children and Youth in a New Nation, historians unearth the experiences of and attitudes about children and youth during the decades following the American Revolution. Beginning with the revolution itself, the contributors explore a broad range of topics, from the ways in which American children and youth participated in and learned from the revolt and its aftermaths, to developing notions of “ideal” childhoods as they were imagined by new religious denominations and competing ethnic groups, to the struggle by educators over how the society that came out of the Revolution could best be served by its educational systems. The volume concludes by foreshadowing future “child-saving” efforts by reformers committed to constructing adequate systems of public health and child welfare institutions.

Rooted in the historical literature and primary sources, Children and Youth in a New Nation is a key resource in our understanding of origins of modern ideas about children and youth and the conflation of national purpose and ideas related to child development.


© 2013 NYU Press  |  Read our Privacy Policy  |  Design by Point Five  |  Developed by Seisan
Resources for:
   Authors
   Educators
   Reviewers/Media

Sign up for our newsletters!
Connect with us!