The New Deportations Delirium

Interdisciplinary Responses

304 pages

4 figures, 10 halftones, 1 table

December, 2015

ISBN: 9781479868674

$49

Cloth

Also available in

Authors

Daniel Kanstroom is Professor of Law and Thomas F. Carney Distinguished Scholar at Boston College Law School. He is the founder of the Immigration and Asylum Clinic and co-founder of the Post-Deportation Human Rights Project. He is the author of Aftermath: Deportation Law and the New American Diaspora and Deportation Nation: Outsiders in American History.

All books by Daniel Kanstroom

M. Brinton Lykes is Professor of Community-Cultural Psychology and Associate Director of the Center for Human Rights and International Justice at Boston College. She is a widely published activist scholar and has received numerous honors including most recently the American Psychological Association’s Award for Outstanding International Contributions to the Psychology of Women and Gender (2014), the International Humanitarian Award (2013) and the Ignacio Martín-Baró Lifetime Peace Practitioner Award (2012).

All books by M. Brinton Lykes

Since 1996, when the deportation laws were hardened, millions of migrants to the U.S., including many long-term legal permanent residents with “green cards,” have experienced summary arrest, incarceration without bail, transfer to remote detention facilities, and deportation without counsel—a life-time banishment from what is, in many cases, the only country they have ever known. U.S.-based families and communities face the loss of a worker, neighbor, spouse, parent, or child. Many of the deported are “sentenced home” to a country which they only knew as an infant, whose language they do not speak, or where a family lives in extreme poverty or indebtedness for not yet being able to pay the costs of their previous migration. But what does this actually look like and what are the systems and processes and who are the people who are enforcing deportation policies and practices? The New Deportations Delirium responds to these questions.
 
Taken as a whole, the volume raises consciousness about the complexities of the issues and argues for the interdisciplinary dialogue and response. Over the course of the book, deportation policy is debated by lawyers, judges, social workers, researchers, and clinical and community psychologists as well as educators, researchers, and community activists. The New Deportations Delirium presents a fresh conversation and urges a holistic response to the complex realities facing not only migrants but also the wider U.S. society in which they have sought a better life.

Reviews

  • “A critical and timely treatment of what has become, both intentionally and inadvertently, a central tenet of contemporary U.S. immigration policy:  mass deportation. The co-editors provide effective rationale for the need to question the efficacy as well as ethics of deportation, an especially harsh approach that undermines health, education, and basic human rights for millions of people.”

    —James Loucky, Western Washington University

  • "This remarkable volume brings together an unprecedented set of scholars from many disciplines to provide voice to the many millions in the U.S. who face the threat of detention and deportation in their everyday routines. The mix of careful legal analysis, social science research, and examination of the profound effects on families, children and youth in this book provides extraordinarily important guidance for those working with, representing, or studying the unauthorized and their family members in the U.S."

    —Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Courtney Sale Ross Professor of Globalization and Education and University Professor, NYU

  • "In The New Deportations Delirium, practitioners from an array of disciplines peel away at the varieties of invidious ways in which the policy is enacted and lived in real people's lives. Kanstroom and Lykes have assembled a tour-de-force cast of authors to provide unique and important insights into the U.S. 'deportation delirium.'"

    —Carola Suárez-Orozco, University of California, Los Angeles

  • "A truly interdisciplinary work which provides the reader with a unique perspective on deportation and its impact on communities both in the United States and receiving countries. I would recommend this book to undergraduate,  graduate students and policy makers with a serious interest in studying this subject."

    —Richard A. Boswell, Professor of Law & Associate Dean for Global Programs, U.C. Hastings College of the Law

  • The New Deportation Delirium is a timely and informative book, and American citizens and policymakers would be well served to acquaint themselves with its message.” 

    Anthropology Review Database

  • “By analyzing the critical ambiguities in current deportation law, the plight of ‘mixed-status’ families, the pressures facing immigration judges, and many other problems, this book makes a substantial contribution.”

    Choice

  • “Ideal for undergraduate and graduate students new to the study of migration and enforcement, The New Deportation Delirium traces the historical development of deportation since 1996 and details the intended and unintended consequences of these policies across time, space, and generations. It offers a rich and nuanced survey of some of the principle arguments across disciplines, while offering new ways to view and understand research and practice for those more seasoned in the debates on detention and deportation.”

    PsycCRITIQUES